Monday, February 9, 2009

USS Norfolk (DL-1)



This is the front third of the "destroyer leader" USS Norfolk, the lead ship in a new class of post-World War II destroyers. She was a great experiment. She new types of guns, a new type of anti-submarine warfare weapon (called "Weapon Alpha"), and a new hull design. For a destroyer, she was a large vessel (5,700 tons vs. 2,100 tons) as she was built on the hull lines of a light cruiser. Despite the size, her design is very pleasing on the eye and almost has a science fiction like feel to it.

However, like many experimental warships throughout the history of the Navy, Norfolk had many problems and was not a tremendous success. However, the lessons learned served the Fleet well in developing other future destroyer types.

6 comments:

John said...

I was aboard from June 15 1960 to June 12 1962. No one has mentioned that the Norfolk was the first shipactually put up after the war and opperated on 1200 lb. steam Was a great ship, however every time we made a full power run the EMs had to replace all the light bulbs. Also I want to tell you it was tough replaceing the running light on the mast, I did it. I could tell you about cleaning the search light, but that is another story. Bless the Navy and all who serve.

Arthur said...

I was on board from Dec 1960 to Oct. 1962 which included the trip around South America where I served as interperter for the shore patrol in Montevideo and Rio, and was also on the high line crew with the Admirals five piece band playing "Anchors Away" on deck while we transferred old movies from ship to ship. Although we do it at night once to transfer a sick guy to our ship.

Arthur said...

ps: The USS Norfolk DL-1 also had the highest and prettyist bow in the fleet.

Leonid said...

My name is Leonid. I am from Russia. I am a navy engineer. My hobby is ships 50-ies. This is a very interesting period, when all the fleets were looking for new types of ships. USS Norfolk is one of the most beautiful ships of the transition period and I always wanted to make his model, but I cannot find good ship plans. Please, help me how to find such ship plans of USS Norfolk as part of the picture? Thank you.

Gordon Calhoun said...

Many public ship plans can be found at the National Archives (www.archives.gov).

Cameron Russell said...

My father was Timothy Russell and served on this ship. I am hugely grateful to anyone who served in the Navy, even though I was not even a blip on the radar. If anyone knew my dad, a real hardass, I would love to hear from you. His son, Cameron: cruss6666@gmail.com. Thank you